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20131202
20131210
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CNNW 5
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
Al Jazeera America
Dec 9, 2013 12:00pm EST
tech companies in the world are teeming up against the national security agency. they all want to limit the federal government from collecting their user information. the companies want more oversight and accountability from organizations like the nsa. we have more in washington and what steps are these companies taking against the nsa? >> reporter: well, for the moment we have this open letter that was published in several newspapers and the elusive agency of several principles that should governor future surveillance by the u.s. government. at the core of those principles is an end to the mass bulk data collection of national security agency. what we learned over the last few months from whistle blower edward snowdon is the nsa is hoovering up vast quantities of information whether you're an american citizen or not and storing it. they say that has to stop. they also say that what is needed is more oversight legal framework. they're getting worried. they fear the more we learn about the u.s. government's surveillance for americans and non-americans, but the lesser we trust american in
NBC
Dec 9, 2013 5:00am PST
google, linkedin, and six other big names in the valley are calling on the national security agency to change its ways. this sin response to the revelations by the edward snowden leaks that the nsa has been collecting user data from the companies, reportedly without the companies knowing or giving their permission. so what is seen as attempt to reassure customers that data is safe t eight are putting their names on an open letter to the president printed in major newspapers, calling for reform of the nsa. first off those are aol, apple, facebook, google, linksedin, microso microsoft, twitter, all here in the bay orare with major ties to the region. on a new website reform government surveillance.komt they established five principles to adopt in attempt to rein in. would like to stop the bulk collection of web data, like them to have more oversight and accountability, and when the nsa legally requests user data the companies would like to be able to publicize that. the fact the companies have come together on this illustrates how concerned they are about the nsa surveillance, when yo
PBS
Dec 2, 2013 8:00pm PST
operation by the national security agency while us president barack obama and twenty five other foreign heads of government or on canadian soil in june of two thousand ten hundred us operation was no secrets to canadian authorities. so can the canadian authorities not only knew about the find was going on in our country but they may have even participated in it and has privacy advocates crying foul earlier by steve anderson executive director of open media for more on this latest docu shock when first asked whether we should never feel like the cry is about these latest disclosures. well we already know a thing. really surprising that most canadians. we're a go it would only allow a foreign spy agency to spy on our soil actually go and our country said its operations and one in three people. as a stronger candidate in the g twenty. i think that he's impressed many came. it surprised me. even though the revelations. i can stay on for the update until you know in my reading chair. it was a the sta many others. i'm really not expect it to all of us and stay inspired. people in canada as to
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 4:00pm PST
phone with their permission on a special app. new reports say the national security agency is running a massive program to track the location of hundreds of millions of cell phones around the world. the nsa collects nearly 5 billion location records a day, almost 58,000 records of call information and other data per expect second. the nsa does it, the post reports, to find unknown associates of people it's targeting for surveillance. >> let's say they're interested in tracking somebody here by the red dot. as that person moves around a path, a certain number of people are going to be following the same general direction. as they move, fewer and fewer people are going down the same exact path. and say fewer people are there and by the time they get to one other location, there's only one person who has been travelng the same path, the green dot right there. >> and they can track when two people arrive at the same location from different directions more than once. cell phones are always emitting location signals, even when you're not making calls and even when your phone is not turned o
CNN
Dec 9, 2013 4:00pm PST
sense. from td ameritrade. >>> is the national security agency infiltrating video games? documents released by former nsa contractor edward snowden she in 2008, the agency planted sleeper agents inside games like world of war craft and second life, amid concerns that those games could be used by terror groups to coordinate attacks. the documents were published today. i talked to spencer ackerman, u.s. national security editor at the guardian which was one of those who broke the story, and i asked him how a game like world of war craft could possibly be a hotbed for terrorist activity. >> world of war craft, like many other really popular addictive, immersive individual yvideo gam deeply, deeply richly developed fantasy game in which you go on quests along with your virtual friends and face things like weird creatures and other things that i don't know about because of course i would never play these types of games. no, never. >> would a terrorist group use such a game to launch an attack? >> well, that's kind of unclear, but the suspicion around the late 2,000s was that as more of
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 3:00am PST
the national security agency basically patrolling all the cell phones in the world basically. a lot of young people point to privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care, is this going to be one of the detriments to people signing up. >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more like seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and to maintain internet freedom. by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, they spend so much time texting and instagrami instagraming. something is coming up every single day. and so all of us spend more and more of our lives in cyberspace. now, the challenge is, first of all, we do have people trying to hurt us. and they communicate through these same systems. if we're going to do a good job preventing a terror attack, a weapon of mass destruction getting on to the new york subway system, et cetera
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 10:00am PST
of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. >>> the super secret national security agency actively monitoring hundreds of millions of cell phones around the world. that, according to today's "the washington post" based on top secret documents divulged by edward snowden. they reveal the spy agency's gathering 5 billion cell phone records every 24 hours. brian todd is looking into the story. cell phones belonging to american as well, are they part of this? >> inadvertently, yes. the nsa, as you no, not allowed to spy on americans and senior u.s. intelligence official tells evan peres the location program, the one reported on, is focused on foreign targets. and the nsa says it does not intentionally target american but was the whereabouts the phones of some americans overseas and some in the u.s. could be collected inadvertently in these operations. a senior u.s. official tells perez they try to minimize that when an innocent american's cell phone's location is collected they try remove that from the database as soon as collected. they're trying to minimize and avoid targetin
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 9:00am PST
. >>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it americans, americans living abroad, how expansive is this, if you're overseas and you're on the phone? >> reporter: well, we don't know a lot about how expansive it is. "the washington post" reporting that this all came from more leaks by, guess who, edward snowden and documents that he had, and that is it about 5 billion cell phone records a day. how much does it affect americans? well, by all accounts, if you're an american, you're out of the country on business or may vation, you pick up your cell phone, use it, that call that record of that call, not the conversation itself, is most likely to be
CNN
Dec 9, 2013 1:00pm PST
they understand the need for the national security agency to protect american citizens, they think the snooping has gone too far. plus, of course, it's bad for business. the companies have been getting hammered with consumer complaints ever since leaked documents revealed the extent to which the nsa tracks internet and cell phone communications. according to the "washington post" the latest document dump showed the agency collects about five billion cell phone records a day. >>> coming up on "the lead," take football and snow, lots of snow, mix in a dash of lesean mccoy, what do you get? well, dare i say perfection. highlights from the craziest sunday in recent memory, next. and it feels like your lifeate revolves around your symptoms, ask your gastroenterologist about humira adalimumab. humira has been proven to work for adults who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. in clinical studies, the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief, and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infectio
FOX News
Dec 1, 2013 11:00pm PST
, the national security agency, top administration officials are now talking about splitting off control of the cyber warfare command, which is now controlled jointly by the head of the nsa, to make those two separate jobs because they say to give them both to the nsa director gives too much power to one man. what do you think of that idea? >> i actually think the idea is good, but not for the reasons the administration has put forward. this is not about the concentration of power. this is about the overburdening of responsibility. i was the director of nsa. i thought it was actually a full-time day work. i don't know you can be the drmsa , as we called him, and a four-star combatant commander. so again, it's not about the overconcentration of power. it's just that the responsibilities have grown too great. >> and intelligence officials are now talking about their real concern that nsa leaker edward snowden may have put together something that's been called a doomsday cache of top secret documents, much more damaging than anything he's released so far, and that they will be released if a
NBC
Dec 9, 2013 6:00am PST
to reform the way the national security agency does business. this is in response to revelations that this past summer that the nsa collected data from the companies, reported by without the companies knowing or giving permission. in what is seen as an attempt to reassure customers that data is safe the eight companies put their name on an open let tear the president printed in major newspapers calling for reform of the nsa. those are aol, apple, facebook, google, linkedin, microsoft, twitter and yahoo! action all companies either head quart erd here in the bay area or major ties to our region. in a new web side, reform government surveillance.com, the companies established five principles they would like the government to adopt in attempt to rein the spy agency. the group would like the nsa to stop bulk collection of web data, see it have more oversight and accountability, and when the nsa legally requests user data, these companies would like to be able to let people know what the nsa is asking of them. the fact the companies have come together illustrates how important a probl
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 1:00pm PST
security agency, basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments to people wanting to sign up? they want to keep their privacy? >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issue is a broader issue. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about, because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and -- vining. there's -- something is coming up every single day. so all of us spend mo
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
intelligence agency lt. gen. michael flynn on national security. in a little more than an hour we will riata washington journal special on the national institutes of health. now, the head of the defense intelligence agency, lt. gen. michael flynn con challenges facing the intelligence community kind of unlimited resources and cyber threats. his comments at the institute of world politics are a little more than an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. my name is john. i am president of the institute. for those of you are new to the institute of world politics, i would like to just introduce us and our mission. we are independent graduate school on national security and international affairs. we specialize in teaching all of the different arts of statecraft by which we mean the various instruments of national power, military strategy, intelligence, counterintelligence, diplomacy, the many arts and public diplomacy and sought power such as culture of a policy, information policy, political action, and that sort of thing. economic strategy and now all of these
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 7:00am EST
was concerned with raining and the national security agency they would have to go after the funding. congress must be happy the way things are going because they don't seem to want to do anything about it. that is all i have to say. robert is on our line for independents. caller: i would like to i heard asay that recent blurb regarding president obama's attempt to rein in nsa surveillance. rathertly think it is disingenuous. it doesn't really matter what administration is in office. council,nal security these are agencies that are so entrenched in our government. they basically operate through a black budget. a lot of money that was siphoned through taxes are going to be totally off the books. it doesn't matter what any president or any policy -- they want to operate independent of the administration and the office. beware of the military and industrial complex. bob is on our line for democrats. caller: i would like to remind folks that when george bush was trying to pass to this -- pass this patriots act, the big response to people worried about losing their freedom or thatty's or whatever w
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 12:35am EST
, with the director of national intelligence, with the fbi, with the nsa, with the national security council, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet office, the national security advisor, gchq themselves, and the dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order to be aware of their concerns before we published them. >> and so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of the 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, okay for publication? >> i think -- in terms of publishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones which have not yet been. >> we did a few more pages of documents that have been redacted. i would not expect us to publish a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. >> what about the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of those, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding which names to redact and which not --
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 10:00pm EST
house, with the director of national intelligence, with he fbi, with the nsa, with the national security council, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet security e national advisor, gchq themselves, and dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order be aware of their concerns before we published them. so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, publication? >> i think -- in terms of ublishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones yet been. not >> we did a few more pages of ocuments that have been redacted. publishnot expect us to a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of hose, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding names to redact and which not -- the guardian ear, has not used any names. in the rare occasion where we'
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 12:00pm EST
, who had dealt with the agencies, who say we should always treat the claims of national security with proper. the only story which is a member of parliament has directly referred to was the so-called deacon net, which i'm happy to talk about if anyone's interested. >> thank you. second question is stay in anniston, the u.s. repertoire and counterterrorism just announced will be looking into this whole issue of intelligent and information given by the u.s. and the u.k. -underscore december said. they hold the government to account and some on suggestions from the tories and the investigation on the tabloid newspapers joining not. are you welcoming the u.n. investigation into this issue about the whole issue about getting an offer of information to the extent that? >> absolutely. we just had a long debate about levin said. during that debate, we heard repeated assurances from all party theaters that the competitions for not interfering the press. and i seems to me a very close hurdle parliament is in danger of farming. as i say, i put earlier that the general counsel of the nsa, so
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17